Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF), also known as congestive heart failure or chronic heart failure (CHF), affects ~26 million people globally. Current monitoring technologies such as weight scales or implantable pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) monitors are either inaccurate or require invasive procedures. SOZO offers a fast, accurate, and non-invasive measurement of fluid burden to better monitor and manage heart failure patients.

Our goal is to improve quality of life and reduce readmissions of heart failure patients.

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Fluid Analysis for Heart Failure

The SOZO Digital Health Platform uses bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS), an advanced application of bioimpedance technology, to objectively measure fluid volume in the human body. When applied to a heart failure patient population, SOZO offers new insight into patient fluid overload to help clinicians monitor and manage their patients.

More Sensitive than Weight Alone

Differentiates between fluid and tissue-related weight changes.

Track Medication Response

Tracks response to medication changes.

Marker for Readmission

Marker for readmission in heart failure patients.

Monitoring and Managing Heart Failure Patients

Reducing hospital admissions is a key quality metric for managing heart failure patients. Heart failure affects approximately 26 million people worldwide1. Once hospitalized, up to 25% of heart failure patients are readmitted within 30 days2,3. Fluid management with the use of diuretics is a cornerstone of heart failure therapy, yet adequate diuresis is not quantified as a quality measure4. To better monitor and manage heart failure patients, an accurate and objective measure of body fluid is needed.

Objective Measure of Fluid Volume

ImpediMed’s sophisticated BIS technology ensures high quality, objective fluid volume measurements, every time.

  • Total Body Water (TBW) volume accounts for all of the water in the body.
  • Extracellular Fluid (ECF) volume includes the water outside of cells.
  • Intracellular Fluid (ICF) volume includes the water inside of cells.
  • HF-Dex heart failure index provides a measure of fluid overload defined as ECF as a percent of TBW.

 

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Fluid Volume and Heart Failure

Reduced cardiac function in heart failure patients leads to a buildup of extracellular fluid. The extent of volume overload leading to decompensation, and symptoms that drive hospitalization, can vary from patient to patient and change with disease progression.

Total Body Water

  • 60% of human body is water5
  • Varies based on age, gender, body size, and composition
  • Maintained by homeostasis
  • Impacted by normal weight gain or loss as well as disease conditions

Intracellular Fluid6,7

  • Majority of body water in healthy adults
  • Muscle contains ~75% water and makes up ~50% lean body mass
  • Decreases in ICF are associated with decreases in muscle mass, especially in the elderly and obese

Extracellular Fluid8

  • Stored in intravascular and interstitial spaces
  • Reduces cardiac function in HF patients leads to fluid volume overload
  • Extent of volume overload leading to decompensation can vary from patient to patient and change with disease progression

Monitoring Fluid Overload

The HF-Dex heart failure index provides a consistent metric for tracking fluid volumes and changes due to impaired cardiac function or medication. A HF-Dex over 51% is a marker for potential future hospital readmission in heart failure patients.

  • Short term diuresis is shown to remove ECF without impact to ICF9
  • Long-term fluid shifts can be impacted by ICF-related tissue changes
  • HF-Dex accounts for changes in ECF and ICF and provides a consistent metric for tracking fluid volumes

Putting SOZO Into Practice

Clinic

Measure patients with SOZO during routine office visits to help assess volume status and to determine whether to adjust medications/therapy for the purpose of managing patient fluid status, symptoms, and condition.

Hospital In-patient

Measure patients with SOZO in the hospital to help determine whether a patient is high risk for readmission prior to discharge in order to extend hospital stay or alter discharge instructions.

Emergency Department

Measure patients with SOZO upon hospital admission to help determine whether a patient’s symptoms result from fluid overload in order to prioritize treatments based on the severity of their condition.

Home

Measure patients with SOZO at home to help assess volume status and to determine whether to adjust medications/therapy for the purpose of managing patient fluid status, symptoms, and condition.

Contact Us

Contact us to learn more about SOZO with HF-Dex and the benefits of implementing an objective measure of fluid volume for your heart failure patients.

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1. Savarese, G. and L.H. Lund, Global Public Health Burden of Heart Failure. Card Fail Rev, 2017. 3(1): p. 7-11.

2. Dharmarajan, K., et al., Diagnoses and timing of 30-day readmissions after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. JAMA 2013. 309(4): p. 355-63.

3. Desai, A.S. and L.W. Stevenson, Rehospitalization for heart failure: predict or prevent? Circulation, 2012. 126(4): p. 501-6.

4. Peled H. Letter to the editor: readmissions and diuretic dosing. JACC Heart Failure 2017;5(8)618 9.

5. Serra-Prat M, et al. Intracellular Water Content in Lean Mass is Associated with Muscle Strength, Functional Capacity, and Frailty in Community-Dwelling Elderly Individuals. A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2019;doi:10.3390/nu11030661.

6. Serra-Prat M, et al. Intracellular Water Content in Lean Mass is Associated with Muscle Strength, Functional Capacity, and Frailty in Community-Dwelling Elderly Individuals. A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2019;doi:10.3390/nu11030661.

7. Serra-Prat M, et al. Total Body Water and Intracellular Water Relationships With Muscle Strength, Frailty and Functional Performance in an Elderly Population. J Nutr Health Aging . 2019;23(1):96-101.

8. Capillary Fluid Exchange: Regulation, Functions, and Pathology. Scallan J, Huxley VH, Korthuis RJ. San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010.

9. Kimura G, et al. A simulation study on transcellular fluid shifts induced by hemodialysis. Kidney International. 1983;24:542-8.